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A Degree In Marijuana Is Now Offered To Help Those Succeed In The Cannabis Industry

By Harry Lyons

It must be an awkward phone call when a student calls home from college their freshmen or sophomore year and tells their parents they have decided to earn a bachelor's of science degree in marijuana studies. The most likely scenario is that the parents are baffled and do a "double take" when first told. Some adults may admit that while they were in college, they spent a majority of their time "studying marijuana" but now it is an actual degree offered at one Midwest university. 
 
Ever since the trend to legalize the medicinal use of marijuana started the industry has skyrocketed into a field that offers many careers. According to the Washington Post legal marijuana created over 18,000 jobs in the state of Colorado alone during 2015. As more states vote to allow recreational and medical marijuana, the amount of jobs in the industry are steadily increasing in numbers across the nation. 
 
The only setback is that since nature's best plant was previously illegal for decades, there are not a whole lot of people that know how to cultivate and sell the natural herb. As the industry quickly grows the demand for skilled workers in the industry is reaching record highs. As an attempt to better train people looking to land a career in the world of hippie grass one university took the initiative to offer the country's first degree in marijuana. 
 
According to Time Magazine, the new degree that is now offered at Northern Michigan University located in Marquette, MI is called "Medicinal Plant Chemistry." The class combines horticulture, botany, biology, chemistry, finance, and marketing all into one course aimed at the weed business. NMU Board of Trustees member Steve Mitchell promised the public that nobody would be growing or using the plant and that no federal or state laws would be broken during the courses. 
 
Now that one university has taken the step to offer pot-related classes it is likely that many other colleges and universities will jump on the bandwagon and offer their own version of dope degrees. Soon people will be at dinner parties telling their peers to call them "Doctor" because they have a Ph.D. in Marijuana. For the parents that hang up the phone when being told that their life savings are going to pay for their beloved child to learn how to grow ganja, just think they could have picked a major in liberal arts with a concentration in basket weaving.